Out of Their Element

High school boys see if they have what it takes to be on the Dream Team

BUST+A+MOVE%0AFreshmen+Josie+Thompson+and+Sophomore+Peyton+Mitchell+perform+during+the+dream+team+routine+at+the+homecoming+pep+assembly.+The+boys+spent+three+weeks+attending+6+a.m.+rehearsals+to+learn+the+dance+with+their+partners+prior+to+the+assembly.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Out of Their Element

BUST A MOVE
Freshmen Josie Thompson and Sophomore Peyton Mitchell perform during the dream team routine at the homecoming pep assembly. The boys spent three weeks attending 6 a.m. rehearsals to learn the dance with their partners prior to the assembly.

BUST A MOVE Freshmen Josie Thompson and Sophomore Peyton Mitchell perform during the dream team routine at the homecoming pep assembly. The boys spent three weeks attending 6 a.m. rehearsals to learn the dance with their partners prior to the assembly.

Hayley Jones

BUST A MOVE Freshmen Josie Thompson and Sophomore Peyton Mitchell perform during the dream team routine at the homecoming pep assembly. The boys spent three weeks attending 6 a.m. rehearsals to learn the dance with their partners prior to the assembly.

Hayley Jones

Hayley Jones

BUST A MOVE Freshmen Josie Thompson and Sophomore Peyton Mitchell perform during the dream team routine at the homecoming pep assembly. The boys spent three weeks attending 6 a.m. rehearsals to learn the dance with their partners prior to the assembly.

Grant Weaver, Contributor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Every homecoming, the Dream Team dancers choose a partner for the homecoming assembly dance routine. The boys, with usually no dance experience, arrive every morning for multiple weeks of 6:30 a.m. practices. They learn a variety of different movements that they are not used to, and many begin to understand the difficulty that is overlooked in dance.

 

“I’ve been dancing for years and love getting to do it as a high school activity. I’m glad to be apart of the team for the Yellow Jackets, especially since it is something I love doing” said senior Jordan Hartman, a 14-year competitive dancer.

 

Dream Team is a challenge in its many aspects and often earns a new respect from the male performers as they are thrown into a new element. Just as learning any new physical activity is difficult, dancing requires very specific movements. Balancing those movements with keeping time and doing one’s best to not look robotic are all factors that have to be taken care of before a performance.

 

“Dancing is a lot of fun, but it gets really stressful when you’re less than a week away and you still feel a little behind. My partner was pretty helpful and it took some time to learn but I’m glad I did it” said senior Noah Simmons.

 

Another overlooked aspect of Dream Team is the early morning practices. Showing up at 6:30 every morning for a few weeks is enough to make anyone feel sluggish. Despite these unfortunate downsides, dancers still love the art.

 

This partner dance was one of the biggest in years. With dream team’s increased size this year, the male partners doubled too.

 

“With as many guys as we had, pulling the whole thing together and finding ways to work with that large group was fun but intimidating. I really was scared about the flips because I didn’t want to drop my partner, but I’m glad it worked and no one got hurt” continued Simmons.

 

Even through learning flips and managing large groups, the team still came out and performed well.

 

“One of my favorite things throughout the years has been Dream Team’s partner dances. It can be challenging, obviously, because the boys don’t usually learn a choreographed dance, but I love seeing them try to do what we do in front of the school. It can be hard sometimes, trying to teach them the moves and getting them to remember it, or trying to do a flip and hoping not to get dropped. However, I love the experience and hope it continues throughout the years. Everyone loves the dances with boy partners” continued Hartman.

 

Partner dances are often a favorite of students and dancers alike. They offer many challenges and rewards. Going after a goal like learning and performing a new skill comes with many pitfalls and requires perseverance. However, many would agree that the experience is fun and worth it.